Tag Archives: stewardship

NBBC Is Hiring: Environmental Education Coordinator

Patterson shows wildlife thriving in the Living Dock to a class from St. Joseph College

Wildlife thriving in the Living Dock

Job Description

The North Brooklyn Boat Club (NBBC) is seeking a part-time Environmental Education Coordinator to oversee educational programming throughout the summer and fall season of 2017. NBBC offers marine-based education to visiting school groups, community organizations and the general public through land-based activities at our headquarters in Greenpoint and on-water canoe tours. We are seeking a motivated self-starter to conduct outreach, handle administrative duties, maintain our educational space and run on-land programming. The Coordinator will report to the Board of Directors and also help coordinate our dedicated volunteers in running educational programming.

Responsibilities

Outreach to existing and new educational, community and corporate partners in scheduling and offering environmental education programming at the North Brooklyn Boat Club’s boatyard. Tasks include outreach and scheduling, coordination with volunteers and running marine based education programming using established NBBC lessons plans and activities.

Work Schedule & Compensation

  • 15 hours per week, May 1 through October 31
  • Availability to work on weekends is a high priority; scheduling is flexible
  • Possibility of additional hours depending on funding availability
  • $20 per hour

Qualifications

  • Highly motivated and self-driven with ability to work well with others
  • A natural communicator with experience in community outreach and engagement
  • Experience working with groups of all ages in educational setting
  • Background in marine or earth sciences is a plus
  • Must be comfortable in small boats, willing to learn basic paddle skills. Canoe experience is a plus
  • Familiarity with Greenpoint/Williamsburg neighborhoods is a plus

Interested applicants should submit a resume and cover letter to info@northbrooklynboatclub.org. Resume should include 2 or 3 references. Position will remain open until filled.

About NBBC

The North Brooklyn Boat Club is a 501c(3) non-profit organization located in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NBBC is dedicated to enabling and advocating for human-powered boating on the waterways bordering Greenpoint/Williamsburg Brooklyn. The organization enables local citizens to be effective stewards of the ecology and so preserve the recreation and freedom that the waterways engender. Since 2012, NBBC has safely taken thousands of people out onto local waterways and run environmental educational programming for dozens of schools and educational groups. More info on NBBC Environmental Education here.

Global Canoe Action at the Convention on Biological Diversity

In April 2016, the North Brooklyn Boat Club joined Global Canoe and Alianza Mesoamericana de Pueblos y Bosques (AMPB) in an action on the East River to tell the world leaders who had gathered at the United Nations to sign the Paris Climate Accords that they must not forget the voices and lives of the indigenous peoples of the world. In preparation for COP13, the Convention on Biological Diversity to be held next month in Cancun, Mexico, Global Canoe has released a video from the Earth Day Global Canoe action:

For COP13, Global Canoe has released this statement:

December 11, Cancún, Mexico
Join the Global Canoe!

We, indigenous peoples and local communities, come to the Biodiversity to tell world leaders that we are the #GuardiansOftheForest and Biodiversity.

Because of this, we demand to be part of the strategies, public policies and programs of defense, conservation and protection of forests and life.

Join the Global Canoe, along with leaders and representatives of indigenous peoples and local communities in an action that seeks to highlight the important role of communities in the protection of biodiversity.

Help us by sharing our video. If you are in Cancun you can be part of the Global Canoe action.

More info here:

This action is organized by AMPB, Greenpeace México, and Coica Amazonía
#GuardiansOfTheForest ​#WeRWarriors

North Brooklyn Boat Club is proud to have been a part of the Earth Day Global Canoe action in New York and stands beside AMPB, Greenpeace México, and Coica Amazonia in Cancún.

Listen to indigenous voices

Listen to indigenous voices


#GlobalCanoe

#GlobalCanoe

Next City: Surfers, Sailors & Other Waterborne Urbanites on Sandy’s Legacy

Hurricane Sandy took her for a little spin

Hurricane Sandy took her for a little spin

For millions of New Yorkers, the evening of October 29, 2012, was their first real, transformative encounter with the city’s vast waterfront. Certainly, before the night Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge overwhelmed river banks and dunes and protective systems, almost everyone who lives in or visits New York had crossed a bridge or been to the beach or enjoyed a peaceful moment where water and the built environment meet. But it wasn’t until October 29 that the city’s 520 miles of coastline were truly laid bare for all to see, and for hundreds of thousands to suffer.

For some New Yorkers, however, that night was a long time coming. The kayakers, surfers, fishermen and sailors that spend their days on the water surrounding the city are well aware of its awesome power. Now, a year and a half into recovery, this group of aquatic urbanites has some very particular thoughts on what happened and what should be done next.

Jens Rasmussen, a founding member of the North Brooklyn Boat Club, is an actor by trade and an adventurer and environmental advocate when time permits. He’s been leading kayak and canoe trips on the East River and Newtown Creek since 2010. “When Sandy hit,” he says, “the club could have lost everything. We keep our equipment in shipping containers at the water’s edge, and if a member hadn’t chained the container nearest to the water to an anchor onshore, that container and all the ones behind it would have floated away in the storm surge.” “A boat we’re restoring did float away,” he continues. “The next day a team paddled out from our base in Greenpoint [in Brooklyn] to search for it and found it on some riprap in the Bronx.”

Rasmussen and the North Brooklyn Boat Club believe that wetland restoration, an idea being explored by the city, is one of the most sensible and effective strategies for protecting New York moving forward. “We know wetlands restoration is superior at storm-surge attenuation. It can absorb and dissipate very large amounts of water,” he says. “We also think it’s a good quality of life and natural beauty feature that can be added to abandoned parts of our waterfront.” Land behind the existing pockets of wetlands, he says, faired far better than the land behind bulkheads and unprotected banks.

Cody Daniels, a 42-year-old surfer who travels to Rockaway Beach in Queens whenever the waves look good, says the surf community was devastated by Sandy. “Over the years, I’ve seen big storms and huge erosion,” he says, “but Sandy just crushed Rockaway. It was third world for months afterwards.” Surfers didn’t go back in the water for a long time. “We didn’t know what kind of chemicals or waste or chunks of trash or spears of rebar might be out there. And you don’t really want to surf when all these families are trying to piece their lives back together. There were a lot of cleanup efforts and some guys volunteered to help rebuild and provide aid.” “I think a lot of people see the Rockaways as more vulnerable now,” he continues. “I know some homeowners want a seawall, but some others think that the waves and the ocean and what’s happening are part of what living on the beach is about. I tend to agree with them, you know, like, you have to accept that risk.”

Lech Zawadzki, an electrician who fishes in the East River says he wasn’t surprised by the storm, but the city’s response bothered him. “Rivers flood sometimes.” he says. “The mayor and the officials should know this and know how to get power back on and fix things quickly.” His own apartment didn’t have power for two weeks. “If it wasn’t for friends, my family would have been homeless. We did not know what to do and no one told us.” The gasoline shortages were a problem too. “I spent days in line for gas when I should have been working to get power back in people’s houses,” he says. “Next time, the city needs to focus on getting the basics back quickly and telling people what to expect.”

Despite their different experiences and outlook, each of these men familiar with the rivers and oceans around New York said something about how Sandy reminded city dwellers that they’re all water people. This, they all agreed, was a good thing. “Awareness and stewardship are inextricably linked,” says Rasmussen. “It’s a central belief of the Boat Club that recreating on blue open spaces in the city, by paddling, we, New Yorkers, all people, learn to value the water and to see how our choices and policies effect the health of the water and the city.”

Next City: Surfers, Sailors and Other Waterborne Urbanites on Sandy’s Legacy, by Graham T. Beck