Tag Archives: urban environmentalism

NBBC on Jimmy Kimmel Live: A Tour of Newtown Creek with Jimmy Kimmel and Bill Murray

We took Jimmy Kimmel and Bill Murray on a canoe tour of Newtown Creek and told them — and audiences all over the world — about the joys and challenges of our home waters.

Check out the video here, and come join us in spring 2020 for another season on the waters of New York City, waters that belong to all of us. We can’t wait to see you for another year of

COMMUNITY • ADVOCACY • ADVENTURE • PADDLING


(Hate Youtube and Google? In the United States you can watch directly on ABC’s site right here.)

Love those boats? So do we! They were purchased with GCEF grant funds and form the keystone of our public and educational programming. Check out the story of the Clipper Langley Canoes here.

And to see more of the Langleys in action on the creek, check out this article about our attendance at the Tideland Institute‘s Lost Islands of New York concert on Newtown Creek, featuring the Wollesonics. It features some great pictures of our fleet.

Join the Fight Against Local Overdevelopment

On the waters of NYC, you learn quickly that everything in the city is connected. We deal with the legacy of industrialism and unchecked development every day. We see the damage wrought by the pursuit of profits at any cost, and we know that only determined, careful, and vocal action by local communities can hope to check the partnership of capital and politics before every living space in the city is overwhelmed.

Klaus steers the Public Paddle

The population of the areas surrounding our home waters has grown dramatically in recent years, and there has been almost no effort to control this growth or make sure that infrastructure and services grow also or to prevent long-term residents’ being priced out of their homes and neighborhoods. Come out to Long Island City’s New York Irish Center on September 12 to TAKE BACK LIC from overdevelopment:

Creek Life! Tuesday Open Hours at NBBC

Come to the NBBC Broadway Stages Boatyard at 51 Ash Street most Tuesday evenings for open hours. The Ed Shed will be open; come look at plankton in our microscope, talk about our new composting system, paint a sign, or just hang out and watch the water go by in Newtown Creek.

For more information or to collaborate on an Open Hours event or find the volunteering opportunity that’s best for you, please contact Lena at education@northbrooklynboatclub.org.

These events are open to the public. We want to welcome you to come learn more about the mission and volunteering opportunities of your community boat club.

Shaped by the waters of NYC: NBBC Open Hours!

NBBC Supports Save the Boundary Waters

In 2014. NBBC welcomed Amy and Dave Freeman on their journey by canoe from Ely, Minnesota, to Washington, D.C., where they hoped to draw attention and federal protection to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, which is threatened by sulfide-ore copper mining. Two years later, the fight not over, Amy and Dave spent an entire year in the BWCA. Part of that year is captured in the short film Bear Witness:

The BWCA is still threatened by the sulfide-ore copper mining. Here’s the latest information from Save the Boundary Waters:

Recently, federal agencies in charge of managing and protecting this area denied two old mining leases next to the Wilderness and announced a two-year “time out” on mining activities in order to thoroughly study the watershed of the Boundary Waters and determine if this is the wrong place for sulfide-ore copper mining. This is a great first step as we work to establish permanent protection, but our work is not done. Please ask your family and friends to join you in signing our petition, thanking decision-makers for taking this first step, and urging them to enact permanent protection for the Boundary Waters: Here’s the link to take action.

We hope all NBBC members and all those who believe in preserving one of the last unpolluted spaces in the United States will tell the government that you care about saving the Boundary Waters Canoe Area from pointless industrial degradation.

We at NBBC paddle all season in waters that are thoroughly imbricated in the country’s industrial legacy. We treasure those small measures of wilderness that break through this history of abuse: egrets in Dutch Kills, kingfishers in Bushwick Inlet, cormorants watching the ferries pass on the East River. All of these things let us see the city again, for the first time, in new ways, and rededicate us to NBBC’s mission: enabling and advocating for access to the waterways of New York for its residents. Stewardship and rehabilitation of those waterways is the natural outgrowth of this mission.

Egret in Dutch Kills, July 28, 2017

It seems natural then, to expand this mission to one of the few places left in the country that has not suffered this extraordinary abuse, where you can dip your canteen into the lake water for a drink and listen to the loons call in the autumn and the wolves howl in the winter. We hope everyone who sees this takes a moment to learn more about the Boundary Waters and then takes action.